Macrochirichthys macrochirus  (Valenciennes, 1844)

Long pectoral-fin minnow
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Macrochirichthys macrochirus
Picture by Baird, I.G.

Classification / Names Common names | Synonyms | Catalog of Fishes (gen., sp.) | ITIS | CoL | WoRMS | Cloffa

Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes) > Cypriniformes (Carps) > Cyprinidae (Minnows or carps) > ex-danioninae
Etymology: Macrochirichthys: Greek, makros = great + Greek, cheir = hand + Greek, ichthys = fish (Ref. 45335).

Environment / Climate / Range Ecology

Freshwater; benthopelagic.   Tropical

Size / Weight / Age

Maturity: Lm ?  range ? - ? cm
Max length : 100.0 cm TL male/unsexed; (Ref. 7050); common length : 35.0 cm SL male/unsexed; (Ref. 2686)

Short description Morphology | Morphometrics

Dorsal soft rays (total): 10; Anal soft rays: 25 - 27. Head upturned; no barbels; belly with sharp keel from throat to anus (Ref. 43281). Body strongly compressed; dorsal profile flat except concave nape. Mouth directed upward. Pectoral fins elongated. Base of caudal fin with black blotch (Ref. 4792). Lower jaw protruded, tip of it hooked and inlaid into gap of upper jaw; scales minute and irregularly arranged (Ref. 45563).

Distribution Countries | FAO areas | Ecosystems | Occurrences | Point map | Introductions | Faunafri

Asia: Thailand to Viet Nam and Indonesia (Ref. 7050). Known from the Mekong and Chao Phraya basins (Ref. 26580).

Biology     Glossary (e.g. epibenthic)

Found in large rivers and lakes at medium to shallow depths. Juveniles feed on insects while adults on fish (Ref. 12693). Move towards the flooded forest when the water is high and returns to the river as soon as the water level starts to subside (Ref. 12693). Good flesh but fairly soft and with numerous bones. In Laos, it is usually grilled, simmered with padek and made into Ponne pa. Usually marketed fresh and probably exported to Thailand (Ref. 12693). Widely distributed but greatly reduced in numbers probably throughout its range. Extremely sensitive to gillnetting and perhaps also to pollution (Ref. 12369).

Life cycle and mating behavior Maturity | Reproduction | Spawning | Eggs | Fecundity | Larvae

Main reference Upload your references | References | Coordinator | Collaborators

Rainboth, W.J., 1996. Fishes of the Cambodian Mekong. FAO Species Identification Field Guide for Fishery Purposes. FAO, Rome, 265 p. (Ref. 12693)

IUCN Red List Status (Ref. 96402)

CITES (Ref. 94142)

Not Evaluated

Threat to humans

  Harmless




Human uses

Fisheries: commercial
FAO(fisheries: production; publication : search) | FisheriesWiki | Sea Around Us

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Estimates of some properties based on models

Phylogenetic diversity index (Ref. 82805):  PD50 = 1.0000   [Uniqueness, from 0.5 = low to 2.0 = high].
Bayesian length-weight: a=0.00389 (0.00180 - 0.00842), b=3.12 (2.94 - 3.30), based on all LWR estimates for this body shape (Ref. 93245).
Trophic Level (Ref. 69278):  3.7   ±0.57 se; Based on food items.
Resilience (Ref. 69278):  Very Low, minimum population doubling time more than 14 years (Preliminary K or Fecundity.).
Vulnerability (Ref. 59153):  Moderate vulnerability (42 of 100) .
Price category (Ref. 80766):   Unknown.