You can sponsor this page

Thunnus tonggol  (Bleeker, 1851)

Longtail tuna
Add your observation in Fish Watcher
Upload your photos and videos
Pictures | Google image
Image of Thunnus tonggol (Longtail tuna)
Thunnus tonggol
Picture by Hermosa, Jr., G.V.


Philippines country information

Common names: Bangkulis, Bariles, Bariles
Occurrence: native
Salinity: marine
Abundance: | Ref:
Importance: commercial | Ref: Rau, N. and A. Rau, 1980
Aquaculture: | Ref:
Regulations: | Ref:
Uses: no uses
Comments: Known to be fished off the Philippines.
National Checklist:
Country Information: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/resources/the-world-factbook/geos/rp.html
National Fisheries Authority:
Occurrences: Occurrences Point map
Main Ref: Collette, B.B. and C.E. Nauen, 1983
National Database:

Classification / Names

Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes) > Perciformes (Perch-likes) > Scombridae (Mackerels, tunas, bonitos) > Scombrinae
Common names | Synonyms | Catalog of Fishes (gen., sp.) | ITIS | CoL

Common names from other countries

Main reference

Size / Weight / Age

Max length : 145 cm FL male/unsexed; (Ref. 40637); common length : 70.0 cm FL male/unsexed; (Ref. 168); max. published weight: 35.9 kg (Ref. 168); max. reported age: 19 years (Ref. 97108)

Environment

Marine; pelagic-neritic; oceanodromous (Ref. 51243); depth range 10 - ? m

Climate / Range

Tropical; 47°N - 31°S, 34°E - 154°E (Ref. 54923)

Distribution

Indo-West Pacific: Red Sea and East Africa to New Guinea, north to Japan, south to Australia. Reported in New Zealand (Ref. 89192).
Countries | FAO areas | Ecosystems | Occurrences | Introductions

Short description

Vertebrae: 39. A small species, deepest near the middle of the first dorsal fin base. The second dorsal fin is higher than the first dorsal fin; the pectoral fins are short to moderately long; swim bladder is absent or rudimentary. Lower sides and belly silvery white with colorless elongate oval spots arranged in horizontally oriented rows. The dorsal, pectoral and pelvic fins are blackish; the tip of the second dorsal and anal fins are washed with yellow; the anal fin is silvery; the dorsal and anal finlets are yellow with grayish margins; the caudal fin is blackish, with streaks of yellow green.

Biology     Glossary (e.g. epibenthic)

Predominantly neritic species avoiding very turbid waters and areas with reduced salinity such as estuaries. May form schools of varying size. Feeds on a variety of fishes, cephalopods, and crustaceans, particularly stomatopod larvae and prawns (Ref. 9684). Marketed mainly fresh and dried salted (Ref. 9684), but also smoked, canned and frozen (Ref. 9987).

IUCN Red List Status (Ref. 115185)

Threat to humans

  Harmless



Human uses

Fisheries: highly commercial; gamefish: yes

More information

Common names
Synonyms
Metabolism
Predators
Ecotoxicology
Reproduction
Maturity
Spawning
Fecundity
Eggs
Egg development
Age/Size
Growth
Length-weight
Length-length
Length-frequencies
Morphometrics
Morphology
Larvae
Larval dynamics
Recruitment
Abundance
References
Aquaculture
Aquaculture profile
Strains
Genetics
Allele frequencies
Heritability
Diseases
Processing
Mass conversion
Collaborators
Pictures
Stamps, Coins Misc.
Sounds
Ciguatera
Speed
Swim. type
Gill area
Otoliths
Brains
Vision

Tools

Special reports

Download XML

Internet sources

Estimates of some properties based on models

Phylogenetic diversity index (Ref. 82805)
PD50 = 0.5039 many relatives (e.g. carps) 0.5 - 2.0 few relatives (e.g. lungfishes)

Trophic Level (Ref. 69278)
4.5   ±0.6 se; Based on diet studies.

Resilience (Ref. 69278)
Low, minimum population doubling time 4.5 - 14 years (K=0.32; assuming tm=2-4; tmax=18.7; Fec>1M)

Vulnerability (Ref. 59153)
Moderate to high vulnerability (47 of 100)
Price category (Ref. 80766)
Very high