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Scomberomorus semifasciatus  (Macleay, 1883)

Broad-barred king mackerel
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Native range | All suitable habitat | Point map | Year 2100
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Scomberomorus semifasciatus   AquaMaps   Data sources: GBIF OBIS
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Image of Scomberomorus semifasciatus (Broad-barred king mackerel)
Scomberomorus semifasciatus
Picture by FAO


Philippines country information

Common names: Broadbarred king mackerel, Broadbarred spanish mackerel, Hasa-hasa
Occurrence: native
Salinity: marine
Abundance: | Ref:
Importance: | Ref:
Aquaculture: | Ref:
Regulations: | Ref:
Uses: no uses
Comments: Known from Sorsogon City (Ref. 58652).
National Checklist:
Country Information: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/resources/the-world-factbook/geos/rp.html
National Fisheries Authority:
Occurrences: Occurrences Point map
Main Ref: Broad, G., 2003
National Database:

Classification / Names

Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes) > Perciformes (Perch-likes) > Scombridae (Mackerels, tunas, bonitos) > Scombrinae
Common names | Synonyms | Catalog of Fishes (gen., sp.) | ITIS | CoL

Common names from other countries

Main reference

Size / Weight / Age

Max length : 120 cm FL male/unsexed; (Ref. 168); max. published weight: 10.0 kg (Ref. 168)

Length at first maturity
Lm ?, range 75 - ? cm

Environment

Marine; brackish; pelagic-neritic; oceanodromous (Ref. 51243); depth range ? - 100 m (Ref. 6390)

Climate / Range

Tropical; 7°S - 30°S, 112°E - 157°E (Ref. 168)

Distribution

Western Pacific: southern Papua New Guinea and northern Australia, from Shark Bay, Western Australia to northern New South Wales. Reports of this species from Thailand and Malaysia are based on misidentifications.
Countries | FAO areas | Ecosystems | Occurrences | Introductions

Short description

Dorsal spines (total): 13 - 15; Dorsal soft rays (total): 19-22; Anal spines: 0; Anal soft rays: 19 - 22; Vertebrae: 44 - 46. Interpelvic process small and bifid. Lateral line gradually curving down toward caudal peduncle. Intestine with 2 folds and 3 limbs. Swim bladder absent. Body covered with small scales. Juveniles (less than 10 cm) marked with 12-20 vertical bands which becomes less distinct or break into spots in larger fish.

Biology     Glossary (e.g. epibenthic)

Found more commonly around coastal headlands and rocky reefs but are also caught offshore (Ref. 6390). Juveniles (4.5 to 10 cm length) are commonly encountered during November along the beaches of Townsville, Queensland and grow to twice this size by January. They are pelagic predators, feeding exclusively on baitfish (sardines and herrings (Ref. 30572). Caught also with set lines aside from trolling with small lures or cut bait. Marketed fresh and frozen; eaten fried, broiled and baked (Ref. 9988).

IUCN Red List Status (Ref. 115185)

Threat to humans

  Reports of ciguatera poisoning (Ref. 6390)



Human uses

Fisheries: commercial; gamefish: yes; bait: occasionally

More information

Common names
Synonyms
Metabolism
Predators
Ecotoxicology
Reproduction
Maturity
Spawning
Fecundity
Eggs
Egg development
Age/Size
Growth
Length-weight
Length-length
Length-frequencies
Morphometrics
Morphology
Larvae
Larval dynamics
Recruitment
Abundance
References
Aquaculture
Aquaculture profile
Strains
Genetics
Allele frequencies
Heritability
Diseases
Processing
Mass conversion
Collaborators
Pictures
Stamps, Coins Misc.
Sounds
Ciguatera
Speed
Swim. type
Gill area
Otoliths
Brains
Vision

Tools

Special reports

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Internet sources

Estimates of some properties based on models

Phylogenetic diversity index (Ref. 82805)
PD50 = 0.5000 many relatives (e.g. carps) 0.5 - 2.0 few relatives (e.g. lungfishes)

Trophic Level (Ref. 69278)
4.5   ±0.80 se; Based on food items.

Resilience (Ref. 69278)
Medium, minimum population doubling time 1.4 - 4.4 years (K=0.6; tm=1-2; tmax=12)

Vulnerability (Ref. 59153)
Moderate vulnerability (39 of 100)
Price category (Ref. 80766)
Very high