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Caranx ignobilis  (Forsskål, 1775)

Giant trevally
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Image of Caranx ignobilis (Giant trevally)
Caranx ignobilis
Picture by Randall, J.E.


Australia country information

Common names: Barrier trevally, Giant trevally, Giant trevally
Occurrence: native
Salinity: marine
Abundance: | Ref:
Importance: minor commercial | Ref: Johannes, R.E. and J.W. MacFarlane, 1991
Aquaculture: | Ref:
Regulations: | Ref:
Uses: no uses
Comments: Known from Cape Cuvier in W. Australia to Wattamolla in N. S. W., including the W coast, the NW shelf, the N coast, the Gulf of Carpentaria, the NE coast & the Great Barrier Reef (Ref. 7300); also from the Torres Strait Islands (Ref. 13465) and off Territory of Ashmore and Cartier Islands (Ref. 75154). Museum: LPPL JIF180 (TGT3136). Also Ref. 5978, 33390.
National Checklist:
Country Information: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/resources/the-world-factbook/geos/as.html
National Fisheries Authority:
Occurrences: Occurrences Point map
Main Ref: Johnson, J.W., 1999
National Database:

Classification / Names

Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes) > Perciformes (Perch-likes) > Carangidae (Jacks and pompanos) > Caranginae
Common names | Synonyms | Catalog of Fishes (gen., sp.) | ITIS | CoL

Common names from other countries

Main reference

Size / Weight / Age

Max length : 170 cm TL male/unsexed; (Ref. 9710); common length : 100.0 cm TL male/unsexed; (Ref. 5213); max. published weight: 80.0 kg (Ref. 4795)

Length at first maturity
Lm 60.0  range ? - ? cm

Environment

Marine; brackish; reef-associated; depth range 10 - 188 m (Ref. 58302)

Climate / Range

Tropical; 26°C - 29°C; 35°N - 37°S, 19°E - 129°W

Distribution

Indo-Pacific: Red Sea and east coast of Africa to the Hawaiian and Marquesan islands, north to southern Japan (Ref. 559) and the Ogasawara Islands, south to northern Australia. Hybrid with Caranx melampygus found in Hawaii (Ref. 58422).
Countries | FAO areas | Ecosystems | Occurrences | Introductions

Short description

Dorsal spines (total): 9; Dorsal soft rays (total): 17-22; Anal spines: 3; Anal soft rays: 15 - 17.

Biology     Glossary (e.g. epibenthic)

Pelagic over sand and rock (Ref. 58302). Adults occur singly and inhabit clear lagoon and seaward reefs (Ref. 9710). They feed on crustaceans (like crabs and spiny lobsters) and fishes at night (Ref. 4887). Large individuals may be ciguatoxic. The largest trevally, reaching 1.7 m in length and a weight of over 60 kg (Ref. 48635). Spawning occurs on shallow seaward reefs and offshore banks (Ref. 37816). Juveniles are found in estuaries. Sold mostly fresh and dried salted.

IUCN Red List Status (Ref. 115185)

Threat to humans

  Reports of ciguatera poisoning (Ref. 9710)



Human uses

Fisheries: commercial; aquaculture: commercial; gamefish: yes; aquarium: public aquariums

More information

Common names
Synonyms
Metabolism
Predators
Ecotoxicology
Reproduction
Maturity
Spawning
Fecundity
Eggs
Egg development
References
Aquaculture
Aquaculture profile
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Genetics
Allele frequencies
Heritability
Diseases
Processing
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Ciguatera
Speed
Swim. type
Gill area
Otoliths
Brains
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Tools

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Internet sources

Estimates of some properties based on models

Phylogenetic diversity index (Ref. 82805)
PD50 = 0.5000 many relatives (e.g. carps) 0.5 - 2.0 few relatives (e.g. lungfishes)

Trophic Level (Ref. 69278)
4.2   ±0.4 se; Based on diet studies.

Resilience (Ref. 69278)
Medium, minimum population doubling time 1.4 - 4.4 years (K=0.08-0.11; tm=3.5)

Vulnerability (Ref. 59153)
Very high vulnerability (82 of 100)
Price category (Ref. 80766)
High