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Tandanus tandanus  (Mitchell, 1838)

Freshwater catfish
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Tandanus tandanus
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Australia country information

Common names: Cattie, Catfish, Dewfish
Occurrence: endemic
Salinity: freshwater
Abundance: | Ref:
Importance: commercial | Ref:
Aquaculture: | Ref:
Regulations: | Ref:
Uses: gamefish: yes;
Comments: Found in Murray-Darling River system of South Australia, Victoria, New South Wales, and southern Queensland. Also occurs in coastal drainages of eastern Australia from Cape York, Queensland, to Clarence River, northern New South Wales (Ref. 5259). Known from Mulgrave and South Johnstone rivers, Wet Tropics, Northern Queensland (Ref. 40054); Burdekin River (Ref. 40171). Conservation status : Vulnerable in Victoria (Ref. 48666). Also found from the Hawkesbury river (New South Wales) to the Daintree river north of Cairns (Queensland) (Ref. 44894).
National Checklist:
Country Information: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/resources/the-world-factbook/geos/as.html
National Fisheries Authority:
Occurrences: Occurrences Point map
Main Ref: Allen, G.R., 1989
National Database:

Classification / Names

Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes) > Siluriformes (Catfish) > Plotosidae (Eeltail catfishes)
Common names | Synonyms | Catalog of Fishes (gen., sp.) | ITIS | CoL

Common names from other countries

Main reference

Size / Weight / Age

Max length : 90.0 cm TL male/unsexed; (Ref. 5259); common length : 45.0 cm TL male/unsexed; (Ref. 5259); max. published weight: 6.8 kg (Ref. 36739); max. reported age: 8 years (Ref. 1107)

Length at first maturity
Lm 45.0  range ? - ? cm

Environment

Freshwater; demersal; potamodromous (Ref. 51243); depth range 10 - ? m

Climate / Range

Temperate; 5°C - 25°C (Ref. 2060); 12°S - 43°S

Distribution

Oceania: endemic to Australia.
Countries | FAO areas | Ecosystems | Occurrences | Introductions

Short description

Head large; thick and fleshy lips; nostrils tubular. First dorsal fin high, with a strong serrated spine and 6 rays. Skin tough and smooth. Body coloration in adults vary from olive-green to brown, black or purplish dorsally and white ventrally. Urogenital papilla triangular in females; longer and cylindrical in males.

Biology     Glossary (e.g. epibenthic)

Adults inhabit slow moving streams, lakes and ponds with fringing vegetation. They swim close to sand or gravel bottoms. More abundant in lakes than in flowing water (Ref. 44894). Usually solitary but juveniles sometimes form loose aggregations. Mainly bottom-feeders (Ref. 44894). Feed on insect larvae, prawns, crayfish, mollusks, and small fishes. Breeding occurs between spring and mid-summer when water temperatures rise to between 20° and 24°C (Ref. 44894). Utilized for human consumption.

IUCN Red List Status (Ref. 115185)

Threat to humans

  Venomous (Ref. 4537)



Human uses

Fisheries: commercial; gamefish: yes; aquarium: commercial

More information

Age/Size
Growth
Length-weight
Length-length
Length-frequencies
Morphometrics
Morphology
Larvae
Larval dynamics
Recruitment
Abundance
References
Aquaculture
Aquaculture profile
Strains
Genetics
Allele frequencies
Heritability
Diseases
Processing
Mass conversion
Collaborators
Pictures
Stamps, Coins Misc.
Sounds
Ciguatera
Speed
Swim. type
Gill area
Otoliths
Brains
Vision

Tools

Special reports

Download XML

Internet sources

Estimates of some properties based on models

Phylogenetic diversity index (Ref. 82805)
PD50 = 0.5625 many relatives (e.g. carps) 0.5 - 2.0 few relatives (e.g. lungfishes)

Trophic Level (Ref. 69278)
3.3   ±0.48 se; Based on food items.

Resilience (Ref. 69278)
Low, minimum population doubling time 4.5 - 14 years (tm=5; K=0.10)

Vulnerability (Ref. 59153)
Moderate vulnerability (37 of 100)
Price category (Ref. 80766)
Unknown